Tag Archives: la Toussaint

Southeastern France

Standard

For the past two weeks I have been on vacation from school. La Toussaint (All Saints Day) is an officially recognized holiday in France, therefore, I get two weeks of paid vacation. Last year during this vacation I headed to Prague. This year, I was torn between going somewhere and staying in Tours to save money for bigger trips in the future. In the end, I ended up with a compromise. I stayed in Tours for the first week and worked my freelance job. The second week I went on a road trip with one of my friends.

While it was nice to be in Tours for part of the vacation, by the end of the first week I was becoming quite restless at the possibility of having to stay for a second week. Luckily, I have a friend living in Tours who also had the second week of my vacation off. We decided we wanted to head to a region of France neither of us had visited. After much discussion, I realized that I have seen a considerable amount of France (as pointed out by my friend).

IMG_4218In the end, we decided on visiting three regions: Auvergne, Languedoc Roussillon, and Provence. A few days before our vacation we made the necessary hotel reservations, rented a car, and began looking at the different things to do in each of these regions. This was one of the most sporadic road trips I have ever taken, and in the end it worked out, even if it was a bit stressful at the beginning. (I like planning and think that it is a very important stage of every vacation.)

Our first destination was Clérmont-Ferrand, in Auvergne. What makes this city so well known is the chain of dormant volcanoes nearby. The city also used rock made from volcanic ash to construct many of its buildings. The darkness if these stones gave the city a grim and almost dire feeling. While the architecture was interesting, I’m not sure this city would be on the top of my list of places to visit in France. It was nice to stop here, as it was the halfway point of our road trip.

One quality of this region that I was pleasantly surprised to find was that one of the regional specialities was actually vegetarian friendly! This never happens in France, so I am usually left eating omelettes and lettuce while travelling in France (and also when in my town). The regional speciality is called truffade. It was very similar to what we call scalloped potatoes in the states, but even cheesier. Apparently, this food is not traditionally vegetarian friendly, but has been made for vegetarians for many years.

After Clérmont-Ferrand we were off to Languedoc Roussillon, where we visited the cities of Nîmes and Arles. Our drive from Clérmont-Ferrand to Nîmes was one of the most beautiful and picturesque views of my life. We drove through the Cévennes. I imagine that the Cévennes are beautiful year round, but during the fall the beauty is taken to another level. The fall foliage extends as far as the eye can see, and for a brief moment, I felt like I was back in the midwest. Also, we arrived just as a light drizzle was ending, so there was a double rainbow. This had to be one of the top five most beautiful moments in my life.DSC07769

After feeling like we had been transported to another planet, we eventually arrived in Nîmes. What makes this region so interesting is the presence of Roman ruins. Also, in Nîmes is the best preserved Roman ampitheatre in the world. Other than the ampitheatre and the maison carrée (which was closed for renovation), there really wasn’t much else to see in Nîmes. However, the highlight of this region for me was the proximity of the Pont du Gard. The Pont du Gard is one of the best preserved Roman aqueducts in the world. While I was less than impressed by the Arènes (ampitheatre) in Nîmes, the Pont du Gard definitely lived up to my expectations.

After spending one night in Nîmes, Scott and I were off to Arles. When one researches this region, Nîmes is much more popular than Arles. However, after visiting both, Scott and I are perplexed as to the reason. Arles is a much more interesting, active, and beautiful city. The whole time we were in Nîmes we felt like we were missing something. It was a very tranquil city–so much so that we had to spend almost an hour trying to find a restaurant. Arles also had many more Roman ruins. The ampitheatre, while not as well-preserved, seemed much more impressive. The other ruins were equally impressive–the theatre, the baths, the churches. We also visited a museum in this town to learn about the history of the region. The one thing I did not do that I would like to do is visit the Vincent Van Gogh Museum. Throughout the city there were posters for the Vincent Van Gogh walk, which explained Van Gogh’s paintings in front of or near where he painted or was inspired. We also visited les Alyscamps, a roman cemetery. In my opinion, visiting in the fall is the best time of year, as the leaves are changing and beginning to fall.

Our final destination was Aix-en-Provence. I spent a very short amount of time here this past summer, but immediately fell in love with the city. It was just as amazing as I remember it. Again, the one thing I wanted to do but didn’t have time for was to visit the Cézanne museum. These two museums alone are reason enough for a return trip with Jeannette in the future. We happened to be in this city for Halloween, a holiday which has become increasingly popular in recent years. Apparently, in Aix, it is common practice to wear your costumes all day and then board the mini choo (a train for tourists) and throw confetti while yelling. It was quite a strange sight to see.

In the end, we made it safely back to Tours. Being able to finally see the monuments and places I have been reading and learning about for the past 14 years was an experience for which I am extremely grateful. I’m not sure where my next adventure will take me, but I have a few ideas in the works.

DSCF8086

Advertisements

Hop a Plane

Standard

Note: I started this post while waiting at CDG for my flight to Prague. Because of an unstable internet connection I had to stop writing until I returned from my vacation. Below is what I originally started.

So, I’m sitting in the airport waiting for my flight to depart. Today marks the beginning of my second week of vacation for la Toussaint. Last week I stayed local because it was Matt’s birthday and his dad and stepmom surprised him with a visit.

Saturday morning I began my real vacation. I took a train from Tours to Paris. I had been to Paris many times before, but was looking forward to this trip because I would be showing a friend around. This was a good challenge for me because when I am with my French speaking friends I tend to rely on them to do most of the talking and question asking. Traveling with a friend who didn’t speak French really helped to push me outside of my comfort zone and to prove to myself that I truly can survive in France.

Paris was wonderful. I arrived a few hours before my friend and hung out at Les Deux Magots. If you ever find yourself in Paris on a cool fall or winter day be sure to visit this café and order the hot chocolate. Oh my yummy! This place is a pit pricey, but an interesting experience for a quick drink and is rich in literature related history. After enjoying my hot chocolate I wandered across the street to explore the church and to view some art nearby.

Once I met up with my friend our whirlwind trip began. We had about 30 hours to see and do as much as possible. We had talked about the most important things to do/see prior to our trip, so we had a plan of action. Our first stop was Notre Dame, as we hoped to go on the gargoyle tour. The line was the longest I had ever seen it, so we decided to try that activity a little later. While we were there we visited the cathedral. Over the course of all of my trips I have probably visited Notre Dame a dozen times. This trip was especially fun because Patrick didn’t know much about the cathedral, so I was able to share all of my knowledge.

From Notre Dame we wandered over to the nearby Saint Chapelle. I had heard about this church, but this was my first time visiting. What makes Saint Chapelle special is its stained glass windows. There are two levels to this church. If you visit be sure to see both, as the second level is much more impressive. While at Saint Chapelle we also bought a Paris Museum Pass, which not only included admission to many of Paris’s most popular attractions, but also allowed you to sometimes skip the line and gain immediate access. The pass was 42€ for 2-days and in my opinion, worth every centime.

While in this area we were also sure to visit Saint-Michael’s fountain. I was recently told that this is one of the most famous fountains in Europe. While I have not. Drifted this statement, after visiting the fountain again I can understand why. We also visited Pont des Arts, one of the bridges covered in locks. I had seen pictures of this bridge, but had never actually been able to find it. I was excited because this has been on my list for many years. We also visited the oldest public park in Paris, which is located just on the other side of Notre Dame.

After wandering around Île de la Cité for some time we made our way over to le Louvre. Again, I have visited this destination many times, but always look forward to visiting because of the massive collection of art it houses. Of course Patrick wanted to see la Joconde, or as she is known in English, the Mona Lisa. Somehow we managed to make our way to the front of the crowd in a matter of moments. We then wandered around the museum for a little of an hour before we both got tired of the crowds. We also decided that now would be a good time for a beverage break and to find our hotel, so we could drop off our backpacks.

We successfully made it to our hotel, which ended up being nicer than I expected. We stayed near Place d’Italie, which I had never explored. The area seemed safe and slightly less expensive than staying in the city centre. After a brief pause, we worked our way over to Montmartre to see the Moulin Rouge and Sacré Coeur. There seemed to be significantly fewer stairs leading up to Sacré Coeur than I remembered. However, it was also significantly cooler than the summer of 2007.

We ended our first day in Paris by visiting l’Arc de Triomphe to get an aerial view of Paris. I told Patrick that I preferred the view from l’Arc de Triomphe because you were able to see la Tour Eiffel and it was less crowded than many other tourist sites.

We concluded our night with dinner at a cute restaurant, the name of which I forget. We called the night relatively early, as we planned to get up early the following morning to get in line to go to the top of la Tour Eiffel. And I’m not sure that our feet could have walked one step more.

So concludes day number one of my vacation.

La Toussaint Vacation

Standard

Life in France is all about living in the moment and enjoying everything. I began my assistantship at the beginning of this month. So far, I have worked a total of eight days. Remember that I only work 12-hours each week, over the course of four days. This means that every week I have at least one day off, in addition to my regular weekend. I was just starting to get into the swing of things and develop a routine in both of my schools.

Last Friday was my final day of work for the next two weeks, due to All Saint’s Day (la Toussaint). It’s difficult for me to comprehend how it is possible for me to already be on vacation, when I have worked a total of eight days! I decided that for this vacation I wanted to visit somewhere in Europe I have not visited. After much research and changing my destination many times, I have finally selected my destination and purchased my tickets.

This coming weekend I will be in Paris. The husband of one of my college roommates is currently working in Dublin and has always wanted to visit Paris. However, he does not speak French and really doesn’t know what to see/do in Paris other than the major tourist destinations. I will spend 2.5 days exploring Paris and then I will continue my vacation by heading to a different destination.

After Paris I will be heading to Prague for 4 days. I have never been to Prague, so am super excited about this new adventure. It is also the first time that I have traveled to a foreign country alone. My biggest concern is not being able to speak the language. When traveling within France I am okay because I can speak the language.

So far on my list of things to do and see in Prague are:

-Charles Bridge

-Prague Castle

-Petrin Hall

-David Cerny’s public sculptures

-Church of Our Lady Tyn

-The Dancing House

-Old Town Square (Astronomical Clock, St. Nicholas Church)

Does anyone have any other suggestions for what I should see/do while in Prague? I’m always looking for additional ideas! I’m super excited for these new adventures!

New Adventures = New Stresses

Standard

I’m about to being my second week as an English Language Assistant. The assistantship is going very well. If anything I am the least stressed I have ever been about a job. I’m only working four days each week, and only half days. That means that by the end of this week I will have taught for eight days.

At the end of the day (11am) Friday I will be on vacation for la Toussaint. I have from October 18th through November 3rd off. During that time, one of my dearest friends, Matthew, will have a birthday. Other than celebrating Matthew, I have nothing special planned…yet.

I have decided that the first week of my vacation I will stay local and enjoy my time off in Tours, during which time is Matthew’s birthday. The second week I would like to visit somewhere new, outside of France. I have changed my mind multiple times about my destination.

My first thought was Brussels, Belgium. When I was a world language teacher in Michigan one of the cities we learned about was Brussels, and ever since then I have wanted to visit. However, there appears to be nothing special going on in Brussels during the month of October. However, during the summer they create a flower rug and have many special activities. I decided I would rather visit Brussels in the spring.

My second idea was Lisbon, Portugal. After much research I learned that Lisbon is one of the safest and most affordable cities to visit in western Europe. As a bonus. it is located considerably further south than France, which means nicer weather. I looked at hotels and flights and cant’ decide if I want to stay in Lisbon or in Estoril. I also realized how close Portugal is to Morocco, one of the countries I will be visiting in July with my mother. Therefore, I decided to postpone my trip to Portugal until July.

Next, I researched Prague, Czech Republic. Much like Lisbon, Prague is one of the safest and most affordable countries to visit. While I’ve wanted to visit Prague for many years, I honestly do not know much about what there is to see and do there. Unlike the other cities I would like to visit, I do not have a list of must see/do while in Prague.

The last destination I have researched for this particular trip was Dublin, Ireland. Dublin has been on my list of cities to visit since I was in high school. The one challenge I am facing with this destination is easily getting there from Tours. Unlike the other destinations, this one is slightly more expensive, at least in terms of travel costs.

So, this week I will continue my research and by the end of this week I will have selected my destination and purchased my plane tickets and booked my hotel.